Who is Deborah Biancotti?

Deborah Biancotti

Deborah Biancotti

Deborah Biancotti has been telling stories since before she could speak and well before she could write. In 2000 she published her first short story and won the Aurealis Award for Best Horror. In 2009 many of her short stories were collected into her first collection, A BOOK OF ENDINGS. The Age called her collection ‘succinct and powerful’. The BOOK was later shortlisted for the William L. Crawford Award for Best First Fantasy Book. In 2011 Deborah’s first novella and was shortlisted for a Shirley Jackson Award.

Deborah has been published in Clockwork Phoenix, Ideomancer, Eidolon 1, infinity plus and anthologies including THE YEARS BEST AUSTRALIAN SF & FANTASY, AUSTRALIAN DARK FANTASY AND HORROR, and the US-based Prime Publishing’s YEAR’S BEST DARK FANTASY AND HORROR. She is also a contributing essayist to TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY GOTHIC. In 2009, one of Deborah’s stories, “Stone by Stone”, was even performed by Shades Theatre Company in their ‘shadowmuse‘ production. In 2011 and 2012 Deborah has worked as Convenor for the Aurealis Awards Graphic Novel/Illustrated Work section.

Deborah is a regular on award lists, writing across a range of urban fantasy, horror, science fiction and steampunk. Her latest works combine police procedurals with the supernatural to create a range of tales that are ‘contemporary weird’. Her newest collection, BAD POWER, presents a series of interlinked short stories in a ‘story suite’ where Sydney-based detectives do battle with a range of strange new superpowers. Deborah writes about her hometown of Sydney as a gritty, industrial place where gods and superheroes seek refuge and where humanity is often in question. She is currently working on a novel series exploring identity and upbringing in a parallel ‘now’.

She continues to write and refer to herself in the third person. She is what you might call a ‘tired idealist’.

 

Writing is like hunting. There are brutally cold afternoons with nothing in sight, only the wind and your breaking heart. Then the moment when you bag something big. The entire process is beyond intoxicating. — Kate Braverman